Doing Morocco right: Visiting Morocco as a solo female traveller

Morocco often seems to just fall short of most “best destinations for solo female travellers” lists, and we think that’s a real shame. In fact, with endless Saharan dunes, soulful Mediterranean beaches, mouth-watering local cuisine, and colourful locals, there are few destinations able to grip travellers’ imaginations so powerfully. For a country which sometimes gets a bad rap for how accessible it can be for independent female travellers, you’d be surprised by how many of you there are roaming across and loving the North African kingdom.

There’s no point in pretending the bad bits of Morocco doesn’t exist but these lows only serve to contrast with the highs, and there’s few countries where these highs are so epic, so dramatic, and so full of wonder. Although we’re big fans, there are undeniably challenges for women travelling in Morocco alone, so we put together these solo female travel tips to help you experience the country and come back with fabulous memories.

Stay safe

Morocco is generally a safe country to visit but it’s worth keeping your guard up while you’re in the bigger cities. Tourism is hugely important to the economy and there’s actually a dedicated Tourist Police force so crimes against foreigners are rare. As with many countries in North Africa though, catcalling and harassment are pretty frequent and, for young women traveling without a male friend or partner, it could get pretty intrusive. There’s not really any way to dress or act that prevents this behaviour, although it helps if you’re part of a larger group and wearing modest clothing (try sunglasses – trust us!). If it happens to you, try not to engage and just walk away.

Beyond the unfortunate hawking in the big cities, Moroccans are world-renowned for their hospitality, and are usually eager to share their culture with visitors. As a solo traveller it is not uncommon to be invited back to someone’s home for tea or a meal. Sometimes, especially for women, this friendliness can seem intrusive when compared to western standards and you can expect multiple daily inquisitions regarding your marital status (and other topics!). If it gets too much, you can just smile, shake your head and change the topic without causing offence.

Plan, plan, plan

Morocco is an absolute melting pot of diverse cultures and landscapes, and you’re going to want to discover every part of it. If you are a nature lover, head north to see Chefchaouen and Asilah, or take the road down south to catch the waves in Agadir and Essaouira. For a taste of urban life, Marrakech is sure to overwhelm and delight, and also serves as a great launching point to the Sahara Desert.

Assuming you don’t have unlimited time, planning is critical to making the most of your time travelling solo in Morocco. If you’re not a planner, you can always join onto a pre-set itinerary with a group tour operator in the country. These companies will set you up as part of a larger group and take you to all the major sites. On the plus side, it means that you don’t have to worry about anything yourself – they’ll take care of your itinerary from start to finish. Of course, this comes at the expense of flexibility so you might end up visiting some sights that might not have been on your own must-see list.

Open yourself to new experiences

Even though you will say no to a lot of people in Morocco, now and then it is OK to just say yes and see where it takes you (even as a female solo traveller). There’s no way of knowing what crazy, ridiculous and memorable experience will fill your days there but I can guarantee that embracing the local customs is the best way to come back with standout memories.  From the relaxing hammam to the magic souks and winding medinas, all become even more magical if you embrace the experience with arms wide open.

Convinced? Why not check out a group tour with On The Go Tours? Their Totally Morocco trip is a fantastic way to see all the key sights in style. With over 20 years of experience running tours across the Middle East and North Africa, they know the region inside out. And, with over 30% of their travellers going solo, the chances are you’ll find someone just like you to share the Moroccan adventure with. As a solo traveller, there are few things that’ll make you feel more settled than making new friends and having them to navigate Morocco’s stunning, chaotic cities with.

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