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Antarctica Expeditions & Tours

An adventure not for the faint hearted. Visit Antarctica with On The Go Tours



The most remote of Earth's seven continents. Wild and windswept. Cold and captivating. Antarctica is unlike any other destination. The land of Sir Ernest Shackleton, it's home to wonderful wildlife and incredible icebergs. An Antarctic expedition cruise is perfect for the adventurous traveller.

A voyage to Antarctica will take you to the end of the world, where few have ever trodden before. It's a journey through the turbulent Drake Passage. It's spotting seals, penguins, and other abundant wildlife on the South Shetland Islands. And it's landing on the Antarctic Peninsula.

Departing from the tip of South America, our Antarctic cruises are guided by an expert expedition team made up of naturalists and other dedicated staff, making sure you get the most from your once-in-a-lifetime trip. And leaving you to enjoy the wonders of the continent.

Antarctica Expedition Cruises

Browse our selection of Antarctica cruises, departing from the southern Argentinian city of Ushuaia. These Antartica tours take in the remote highlights and wildlife of the Antarctic Peninsula, King George Island, and the South Shetland Islands, plus much more!

Handpicked Range
Fur seals on Adelaide Island - Antarctica Expedition Cruises - On The Go ToursClassic Antarctica - 10 days Map

Classic Antarctica

10 days | FROM €5,835

Embark on a classic expedition to Antarctica from Ushuaia, through the scenic Beagle Channel and across the...

Handpicked Range
The Ushuaia with giant icebergPolar Circle Quest - 12 days Map

Polar Circle Quest

12 days | FROM €10,565

Setting sail from Ushuaia, embark on an expedition to the Antarctic Peninsula and Polar Circle. Pass through...

The Ushuaia

The expedition ship used on our Antarctica cruises is called the Ushuaia. Aboard the ship, you'll enjoy comfortable accommodation in a choice of cabins, a spacious open-air deck to spot sea birds and marine life, an open-bridge policy where you can learn about navigation from the officers, and a schedule of lectures from a team of expert naturalists.

We endeavour to make two shore landings per day, allowing you to set foot on the continent itself, get up close and personal with the local wildlife and to visit at least one of the scientific stations to gain insight into the research being done here.

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Frequently asked questions about our trips to Antarctica

When is the best time to visit Antarctica?

Antarctica is a land of extremes, and for much of the year, visiting isn't possible. This is because the seas are too rough to navigate from April - September. Our expedition cruises only operate during the Antarctic summer, when the region is more navigable.

Temperatures rarely climb above freezing, but the "warmest" months are December - February. For more information, check out our guide to the best time to visit Antarctica.

What should I pack for my Antarctica expedition?

It goes without saying that warm clothing, boots, and waterproofs are essential. But it's easy to forget items such as sunglasses and sunscreen, which are important to remember.

The key to navigating Antarctica is lots of layers of clothing. Whilst it is freezing outside when you are exploring the Antarctic Peninsula, things will be warmer aboard the ship, so you need to be able to add and remove layers easily.

Another piece of advice is to bring moisturizer. The windy conditions of Antarctica are more inhospitable than anything you've experienced before, and your skin will thank you. Earplugs are a good idea too, especially if you are a poor sleeper.

Will you always stick to the itinerary?

Weather permitting, we will always endeavor to stick to the itinerary of each tour. However, in an environment such as Antarctica's, conditions can sometimes make this impossible.

Adverse weather or other issues can cause itineraries to change, but rest assured your expedition team will always go out of their way to make sure you have the very best experience possible.

Can I have some more information about the ship?

Of course! The expedition ship used for our polar adventures is the Ushuaia. There is lots more information about the ship and about expedition cruising in the trip notes of each tour, and in our online guide.

Will my phone work?

The short answer is, no.

Antarctica has little in terms of communications infrastructure, so the Instagram snap of an emperor penguin colony will have to wait until you are back in South America. And there is no Wi-Fi aboard the Ushuaia. it's better to turn your phone off and enjoy the experience anyway!

However, the ship does have onboard computers and a phone, which can be used to check emails or make international calls, for a fee.

Will these tours damage the fragile environment?

It is crucial that polar exploration leaves no impact on the fragile ecosystem, in the form of litter and waste. Your expedition team are highly trained and will ensure that wildlife is not disturbed, and that rubbish is not left behind, though it is also down to you to make sure you don't leave litter behind.

When stepping off the ship to explore, travellers will be asked to thoroughly wash their boots. This is to stop any cross-contamination of seeds or microscopic creatures from islands previously visited, or from Argentina.

Aboard the ship, all waste is safely and correctly disposed of.

The best of Antarctica

From the rare wildlife and pristine ecosystems to the dramatic scenery and uninhabited islands, Antarctica is a destination like no other. Plus, during your visit, you are going to be some of the most southern human beings on the planet, surrounded by more penguins than members of your own species. Here are the main highlights of a trip to Antarctica.
Humpback Whale - Antarctica

Wildlife

From great whales to lumbering elephant seals and curious penguins, Antarctica is home to some of the world's most incredible, and most threatened wildlife. Penguin rookeries thousands-strong, killer whales hunting slow-moving seals at the coast, and blue and humpback whales breaching the waves. All of these are things you could see on your Antarctica expedition cruise!

Antarctic Peninsula - On The Go Tours

The Antarctic Peninsula

Become one of just a handful of people alive to have stood on the seventh continent as you make landfall on the Antarctic Peninsula. You'll need to wrap up warm against the chill, but the reward is jagged mountain peaks, grumbling glaciers millennia old, and yet more of the region's diverse and resilient wildlife.

Midnight sun over the Drake Passage - Antarctica

Drake Passage

Regarded as one of the most treacherous sea crossings in the world, the infamous Drake Passage is no match for the Ushuaia, but crossing the body of water between Cape Horn and the South Shetland Islands is an experience nonetheless! This point is where the warmer waters of the north converge with the colder Antarctic waters. The result: an incredible array of marine biology.

South Shetland Islands - Antarctica - On The Go Tours

South Shetland Islands

A collection of rocky islands and islets teeming with life, the South Shetland Islands are a must-visit destination on any Antarctic expedition. Whether you're viewing wildlife and navigating sea ice from a small zodiac boat off the coast, or trekking on land, you're sure to see something that will stay with you forever.

The wildlife of Antarctica

For the majority of travellers on our Antarctica tours, seeing rare polar wildlife is one of the main reasons for wanting to visit the seventh continent. From penguins to seals and whales, here are some of the species you could spot on your Antarctic expedition.

Solar Eclipse & Antarctica Explorer 2021 main image - humpback whale tail

Whales

The gentle giants of the seas. The waters surrounding Antarctica are home to numerous species of whale, with plenty of food available in the form of krill, squid, and other crustaceans for the marine mammals. Species to keep your eyes peeled for include the largest of them all, the Blue whale. Humpback whales, Sperm whales, Minke whales, and Killer whales - the largest member of the dolphin family, can also be seen. After decades of hunting, many whale populations are now rebounding, meaning the chances of spotting these amazing creatures is better than ever!

Penguins

With no predators on land - there are no polar bears in Antarctica - penguin rookeries explode in numbers. Species such as Emperor penguins, Adelie penguins, Gentoo penguins and Chinstrap penguins live in huge colonies thousands strong. Some penguin colonies are so large that they can be seen from space, quite the reason to visit the continent! Many species of penguin mate for life, and couples rear chicks year after year for their entire lives. Antarctic penguins are also notoriously unafraid of mankind, leading to all sorts of memorable wildlife encounters.

Cruise Antarctica and Solar Eclipse main image - King Penguins on South Georgia
Elephant Seal - South Georgia - Antarctica - dreamstime_m_134759701

Seals

There are six species of Antarctic seals, including Crabeater seals, Weddell seals, and Fur seals. But the most charismatic species to be found in the region is the giant Elephant seal, with males of the species sometimes weighing in at 4,000kg! They have a large nose, reminiscent of an elephant, and whilst slow and laborious on land, move gracefully and quickly through the water, where they do their best to evade the hungry jaws of Orcas, sharks and the similarly large and vicious Leopard seals.

Need more information? Check out our online Antarctica travel guide!